Roses in the Ocean

my heart holds you

just one beat away

the tears in my soul

fall quietly every day

 

did this really happen

or are you just away?

will you walk through my door?

will you call me one day?

 

your pain was so intense

we shared more than most

the privilege of your love and trust

came at such an unbearable cost

 

stay close, watch over me

from so many stars apart

roses in the ocean…

you forever in my heart

 

my thoughts as I wake

through the day and when I sleep

are of you, my magnificent brother

for who my love runs deep

 

if there is one thing I could change

it would be that fateful time

I would be there for you, as always

holding on to you for life

 

somehow, some way

I wish with all my might

you find a way to tell me

you forgive, that you’re alright

 

stay close, watch over me

from so many stars apart

roses in the ocean…

you forever in my heart

 

Love from Brony November 2009

LGBTQIA+ ATTEMPT SURVIVOR ACTION GROUP

Roses in the Ocean is proud to announce the establishment of a new national LGBTIQA+ Attempt Survivor Action Group for people who have a lived experience of suicide attempts.

We are seeking a diverse range of people from across Australia who can bring their lived experience of suicide attempts to the forefront of conversations and activities relating specifically to LGBTIQA+ communities and more broadly to all suicide prevention initiatives.

The increased visibility, voices and insights from people who possess the intersectionality of being both a suicide attempt survivor and a member of LGBTQIA+ communities in Australia is very much needed. . The insights you have gained from your lived experience of suicide attempt will contribute to informing how we can collectively amplify the voices of LGBTIQA+ attempt survivors and contribute your important perspectives to all Roses in the Ocean activity.

If you are interested in being part of Roses in the Ocean’s LGBTIQA+ Attempt Survivor Action Group please read and complete an Expressions of Interest.

Supporting others after suicide

How do I support others after suicide? What do I say? What do I do?

Source: Standby Support After Suicide. Download PDF of Ideas for Support.

 

Listen – I may have intense emotions that could include anger, sadness, fear and guilt. Be prepared for any or all reactions, you cannot take these away, but being there, listening and showing you care can be comforting

Share memories – don’t be afraid to talk about the person who died and what they meant to you. It is important for me.

Understand – the healing process takes time, it can take months or years to find a liveable place for my loss. Remembering birthdays and special days can be particularly difficult.

Be OK with silence – do not feel compelled to talk because you may feel uncomfortable. Don’t try and fix me, for now just sit with me

Remember – I may need assistance with accessing information, medical/psychological support or meeting other responsibilities. It may be useful for you to be my driver, make essential phone calls, or assist me in meeting my children’s needs

Practical support – offer practical support such as making a meal, doing shopping, gardening or washing

Nurture relationships – keep in touch regularly. There may be times when offers are refused but keep trying. If you don’t know what to say, be honest and say ‘ I don’t know what to say but I am here for you’. A note or text in between other contact with words such as I’m thinking or you or I miss them too lets me know I’m not alone

Language – the language you use should not judge the way my loved one died

Be kind – to yourself as you may also be affected by the loss and have your own grief to work through.